All 12 youth football players and their coach have now been rescued from a flooded cave in northern Thailand, following a perilous three-day operation that was first dubbed ‘Mission Impossible’.

The final four school boys and their coach, who had been trapped in darkness in Tham Luang Cave in Chiang Rai for 18 days, were carried out on stretchers to waiting ambulances on Tuesday afternoon.

Among those extracted today is the youngest member of the team, 11-year-old Chanin Wiboonrungruang, whose nickname is Titan, and coach Ekaphol Chantawong, 25.

The only people who remain to be evacuated from the cave are four Thai Navy SEALs – including a medic – who stayed with the group since they were discovered huddled together on a muddy ledge 2,620ft (800 metres) underground on July 2.

The Thai Navy SEALs confirmed the success of the operation on their official Facebook page, writing: ’12 wild boars and coach out of the cave. Everyone is safe. Now just waiting to pick up four frogs [Navy SEALs]. Hooyah.’

The 12 boys and their coach became trapped during a visit on June 23 when monsoon floods blocked the cave exit and forced them back three miles into the mountain.

They ended up stranded on a ledge, starving in the darkness,  until they were found by a team of British divers over a week later.

The 12 boys and their coach became trapped during a visit on June 23 when monsoon floods blocked the cave exit and forced them back three miles into the mountain.

They ended up stranded on a ledge, starving in the darkness,  until they were found by a team of British divers over a week later.

The 12 boys and their coach became trapped during a visit on June 23 when monsoon floods blocked the cave exit and forced them back three miles into the mountain.

They ended up stranded on a ledge, starving in the darkness,  until they were found by a team of British divers over a week later.

He added: ‘They are diving in something that is considered an extremely hazardous environment, in zero visibility, the only light in there is the torches you bring yourself.

‘We were obviously very afraid of any kind of panic. I cannot understand how cool these small kids are … Incredibly strong kids.’

Two of the eight boys rescued on Sunday and Monday are being treated for pneumonia and the other six have hypothermia, a Thai doctor revealed.

The rescued boys are said to be in good spirits and feasting on bread with chocolate spread.

Their relieved parents were forced to wear surgical robes and masks and were not allowed to hug their sons to prevent infection when visiting them in hospital last night.

The first eight to be evacuated have all been given inoculations against rabies and tetanus, and are all being treated with antibiotics amid fears they may have been bitten by disease-carrying bats inside the huge underground network.

The boys are weak and ravenously hungry, Thailand’s public health chief Dr Jedsada Chokdamrongsuk revealed, but have been laughing and joking with staff and officials.

Among the first things the children told medical staff were ‘we miss home’ and ‘we’re happy’, he added.

However, they are unlikely to be well enough to take up FIFA’s invitation to watch the World Cup final in Moscow later this week.

‘All of the boys were suffering from hypothermia when they arrived at the hospital,’ Dr Jedsada said.

‘But they have all now reached normal body temperature. The hypothermia could have been a result of diving for several hours.

‘All of the boys have been given inoculations and rabies inoculations because of the concern that they may have been bitten by bats which live in the cave.

‘One of the boys has a slow heartbeat but overall they [the eight evacuated so far] are in a safe condition and their lives are not in danger.’

The doctor said blood samples taken from the boys will be sent to a specialist lab in Bangkok to test for ’emerging diseases’.

Their relieved parents will only be allowed to go to their bedsides once they have been given the all-clear.

‘But parents and other families members must remain two metres from the boys and must wear surgical masks and robes when they visit them,’ Dr Jedsada said.

Dr Jedsada said in general the boys are in good spirits.

‘They are very talkative. They were laughing and joking with the prime minister [General Prayut Chan-o-Cha] when he visited them last night.

‘They say they are happy to be out of the cave and want to go home.’

But he said the boys would remain in hospital for at least a week and were unlikely to be well enough to travel to Russia for the World Cup final on Sunday.

‘The boys are unlikely to be well enough to go to watch the World Cup final in Moscow but they can watch it live on the TV for sure.’

The relieved parents of the rescued Thai school-boys beamed with delight after visiting their beloved sons at hospital last night.

The mothers and fathers could hardly contain their joy at the successful reunion with their children at the Chiang Rai Pranukroh Hospital – despite not being allowed to kiss or hug them

The parents were given a message of support by Thai Prime Minister General Prayut Chan-o-Cha, who visited the Tham Luang cave rescue site yesterday.

They followed the PM from the jungle site to the hospital in the provincial capital Chiang Rai where they were able to see their boys.

The relieved parents – and at least one little sister – can be seen smiling and clearly relieved as the talk to General Prayut.

Among the group were the parents of Pipat Phothi, known as ‘Nick’ and Ratdao Janthapoon, the mother of Prajak Sutham, known as ‘Note’.

Earlier the prime minister visited the rescue operation centre in front of the cave entrance and met Thai military officers, cave diving specialists – including the British pot-holers – and the all the rescue workers.

General Prayut also visited medical staff at the Chiang Rai Pranukroh Hospital who are treating the stricken Wild Boar FC players.

Pictures of General Prayut’s visit to the rescue site and the hospital were released by the Thai government last night.

The meetings with the parents in the jungle and later at the hospital took place after the eighth boy was evacuated from the flooded cave.

Yesterday afternoon, public health inspector Dr Thongchai Lertwilairattanapong said the parents of the latest foursome would be allowed to see their children in the evening but added: ‘Visitors will only be allowed to meet and talk to the patients but no hugging or touching – and they need to leave a one to two-metre distance.’

The boys are being monitored for breathing difficulties, hypothermia and an airborne lung infection known as ‘cave disease’ caused by bat and bird droppings which can be fatal if untreated.

Last night, the Thai prime minister flew to the cave to thank the rescue squad, and said the ordeal should serve as a wake-up call to all children to avoid it happening again.

British cave experts have been spearheading the three-day operation which involved more than 100 divers. Seven Britons chaperoned the boys through the treacherous tunnels as part of a team that included 18 international cave divers and five elite Thai navy SEALS.

Scores of other volunteer cave divers from around the world have been helping by delivering air refill tanks and tightening the guide rope along the route, which includes ten ‘choke points’ where the mud-clogged tunnel is terrifyingly narrow.

Friends of the British experts claimed they ‘never panic’ under water and would be keeping reassuring eye contact with the children. Wearing full-face masks, the boys either swam or were pulled along. Yesterday’s nine-hour mission – starting at 11am – was two hours shorter than Sunday’s.

A source who saw two of the four boys walk out of the cave yesterday said they looked ‘tired but healthy’, adding: ‘Imagine marathon runners. It’s like when they reach the finish line exhausted.’

Last night the Thai prime minister flew to the cave to thank the rescue squad, and said the ordeal should serve as a wake-up call to all children to avoid it happening again.

dailymail

5 Replies to “All 12 Thai Cave Boys And Their Coach Rescued”

  1. I am extremely impressed along with your writing talents and also with the layout for your blog. Is this a paid topic or did you customize it yourself? Either way stay up the excellent high quality writing, it’s uncommon to look a great weblog like this one nowadays..

  2. First of all I would like to say fantastic blog!

    I had a quick question which I’d like to ask if you don’t
    mind. I was interested to find out how you
    center yourself and clear your thoughts before
    writing. I have had a tough time clearing my thoughts in getting my ideas
    out there. I truly do enjoy writing but it just seems like the first 10 to 15 minutes
    are usually lost simply just trying to figure out how to begin. Any
    recommendations or tips? Appreciate it!

  3. Thanks for your personal marvelous posting! I definitely enjoyed
    reading it, you can be a great author. I will be sure to bookmark
    your blog and will come back down the road. I want to encourage yourself
    to continue your great writing, have a nice afternoon!

  4. Hey just wanted to give you a brief heads up and let you know a few of the images aren’t loading
    correctly. I’m not sure why but I think its a linking issue.
    I’ve tried it in two different internet browsers and both show the same outcome.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *